An Introduction: Society of Catholic Scientists

  • 06:00 PM

The Society of Catholic Scientists is an international lay organization founded in June of 2016 to foster fellowship among Catholic scientists and to witness to the harmony of faith and  reason.

The Society hopes to answer the call of Pope St. John Paul II that ‘members of the Church who are active scientists’ be of service to those who are attempting to ‘integrate the worlds of science and religion in their own intellectual and spiritual lives.’ The Society will do this through annual conferences, symposia and seminars, discussion groups, lectures, and other activities.

In its first year, the SCS grew to 500 members. Nearly a hundred scientists attended its inaugural conference in April, 2017, along with theologians, philosophers, and historians.

The Society also provides opportunities for Catholic undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers in the natural sciences to get to know and interact with more senior colleagues. In this way the Society hopes to provide role models and mentors for young Catholics who are on the way to possible careers in science.

Their core mission is:

  1. To foster fellowship among Catholic scientists.
  2. To witness to the harmony between the vocation of scientist and the life of faith.
  3. To be a forum for reflection upon and discussion of questions concerning the relation of science and the Catholic faith.
  4. To act as a resource for Catholic educators, pastors, and lay people, and for journalists and members of the general public who have questions about the significance of scientific theories and discoveries and about the relation of science and faith.

Reception to follow event.

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About the speaker:

Stephen M. Barr (President, SCS) is Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Delaware and Director of its Bartol Research Institute.  (Ph.D. Physics 1978, Princeton University) Prof. Barr does research in theoretical particle physics, especially grand unified theories, theories of CP violation, neutrino oscillations, and particle cosmology. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (2011). He is the author of Modern Physics and Ancient Faith (Univ. of Notre Dame Press, 2003).